Craig George

Craig George

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Fine Arts represents
Craig George

The artwork of Craig George (Diné) reflects two vastly different cultural experiences: His upbringing in Los Angeles’ South Central neighborhood and his current life on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Initially a self-taught artist, he later enrolled in the Institute of the American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe, which gave him a greater appreciation for the culture of other tribes. He has paintings in permanent or private collections at the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe, and at the University of Oklahoma.

“I first started with pencil and ink at nine years old. I just started drawing, spray painting. The first time I picked up a brush was around 1995, when I was in art school. When I got that first money when I started drawing for people [in high school] I thought, ‘This can work.’ When I was practicing [when I was younger], I used walls as my paper, maybe in alleys or someone’s garage.” I paint from morning until the sun goes down. That’s my day. I usually have eight pieces up [at a time] and just work on them. That’s my heart, that’s my love. That’s what keeps me going and grounded.”

His work ranges from pieces incorporating graffiti and mixed media to saturated landscapes. In addition to amazing landscapes and the occasional abstract or collage, he paints scenes based on what he saw and experienced growing up in Los Angeles – home to the largest off-reservation Indian population in the country. The tags, the wall signs, the graffiti -all of it- is based upon actual places and scenes.

“The rich tradition of graffiti art is incorporated into my pieces,” Craig says, “while living on the rez gives me a wealth of material right in my backyard: night skies, ceremonies, music and landscape. I don’t take my gift for granted and put my heart and soul into each piece. As an artist I visualize and record things that are important to me and my culture. It’s my responsibility to carry on our traditions.”

“Living on the reservation is beautiful: Open range, fresh air, gorgeous sunsets, animals are free to roam, very peaceful, calm silence. I don’t hear any police sirens, helicopters overhead, I don’t have to look over my shoulder, little things like that. Because I live on the reservation I got to learn more about my culture and ceremonies, how to be at peace with Mother Nature. So you’ll see all those things in my artwork.”

— Craig George

Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George
Artwork by Craig George

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